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International Recognition

The Chelonian Conservation and Biology – the international scientific peer-reviewed Journal of Turtle and Tortoise Research – published the Gnaraloo turtle research findings from 2008/09 – 2015/16, which total 8 years of successful research at the Gnaraloo Bay Rookery.

This achievement is in no small part due to our scientific field teams, Gnaraloo staff, the Richardson family, Landcare, the Australian Government, esri Australia and Brains, as well as mentors, advisors, contractors, and other loyal supporters who have assisted the program.

Gnaraloo turtle migrations

During nesting season 2015-16, we satellite tracked 10 Western Australian Loggerheads, at Gnaraloo Bay and Gnaraloo Cape Farquhar, to help understand inter-nesting movements, post-nesting migrations, and identify foraging grounds and potential threats across the turtles’ entire nesting range in Western Australia.

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Read our sea turtle scientific reports

We’re excited to share our detailed scientific reports. These rigorously researched documents reflect important baseline data on the sea turtles of Gnaraloo. Our scientists use this data to inform responsible management and protection of endangered sea turtles and their critical coastal nesting habitat.

The Gnaraloo Turtle Conservation Program was started and managed by the Gnaraloo Station Trust (the predecessor of the Gnaraloo Wilderness Foundation) in 2008/09 and will end in 2017/18 unless there are new funding sources.

Read our feral animal control reports

The Gnaraloo Feral Animal Control Program was started and managed by the Gnaraloo Station Trust (the predecessor of the Gnaraloo Wilderness Foundation) in 2008/09 and ended in 2014/15.

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Sea turtle conservation

The scientific Gnaraloo Turtle Conservation Program identifies, monitors and protects key coastal nesting rookeries of endangered sea turtles on Gnaraloo beaches.

Sea turtle migrations

During the sea turtle nesting season 2015/16, the Gnaraloo Turtle Conservation Program undertook the first ever satellite tracking of loggerhead females that nest on the Gnaraloo coastline.

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